5 Things You Better Ask Before Entering a Cross-Cultural Marriage in The Philippines – Retiring to the Philippines

Over the past three years that Sylvia and I have been together, she’s been sharing a lot of information about the differences between Filipino and American cultures. And I’ve gotten to know and visit with members of her family in the Philippines thanks to Facebook and Facebook Messenger. So even though I know there are some changes in what I’ll be expected to do and not to do, I don’t expect any major surprises.

The linked article is pretty interesting, though.

Last year I got married to my beautiful wife, K. I’m from Ireland, and she’s from The Philippines. We’re both in our early thirties, and we love each other dearly. But boy are there some questions I wish I’d asked and some things I wish we’d talked about before we tied the knot! Don’t get […]

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2 thoughts on “5 Things You Better Ask Before Entering a Cross-Cultural Marriage in The Philippines – Retiring to the Philippines

  1. Another world, brother, another world, same planet, different rules. I learned a few things while in Europe for a couple of years in the 80s, and some things about the Arab nations while in Saudi Arabia and Iraq. The biggest shock was the Arab difference. For instance, public restrooms are small spaces with a hole in the floor and a hose on the wall. Toilet paper? They never head of it. You use your left hand and rinse with the cold water hose, which is why it’s an insult to try to shake hands using the left, or t o pint at someone with the left hand. Europe was similar to us, but it has its differences, too,

    1. Oh, I’m sure I’ll come across differences in the Philippines. But I’ll be experiencing them within the context of a family I already know, and many of whose members already know me. I talk frequently with many of them. Also, the Knights of Columbus is very strong over there, and I already know some KofC officials in Cebu who are looking forward to my arrival.

      When I do encounter differences, I’ll be in the company of people with whom I already have much in common, so my adjustments will be easier.

      Another thing that has helped is watching TFC (The Filipino Chanel) on a regular basis with Sylvia. I’m still not picking up on the language, but I am learning, bit by bit, how life is lived there.

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