Malta sinks

In World War II, Malta was described as the ‘unsinkable aircraft carrier’. Well, it has sunk now. The Bishops of Malta (both of them) have stated that anyone in an irregular union who feels ‘at peace with God’ should not be excluded from Holy Communion or from Sacramental Absolution: at least, that’s what they seem to say. Readers can judge for themselves.

Above is the opening paragraph of a very well-written essay that relates yet another sad episode in the ongoing descent of the Catholic Church’s Vatican II cult. The full essay can be read in its entirety at its source: RORATE CÆLI: Malta sinks.

Maker of the World, King Eternal, Have mercy upon us! (HT: Vox Cantoris)

Today those of us who follow the Traditional Latin Mass will sing this particular Kyrie: the Orbis Factor Kyrie. For those who are interested in its history, and in how it is most appropriate for those of us living at this moment in time, let me refer you to the blog post at Vox Cantoris.

The words of this Kyrie and their English translation follow.

Latin/Greek:

1. Orbis factor rex aeterne, eleison. Kyrie, eleison. Kyrie, eleison.
2. Pietatis fons immense, eleison. Kyrie, eleison. Kyrie, eleison.
3. Noxas omnes nostras pelle, eleison. Kyrie, eleison. Kyrie, eleison.
4. Christe qui lux es mundi dator vitae, eleison. Christe, eleison. Christe, eleison.
5. Arte laesos daemonis intuere, eleison. Christe, eleison. Christe, eleison.
6. Conservans te credentes confirmansque, eleison. Christe, eleison. Christe, eleison.
7. Deum scimus unum atque trinum esse, eleison. Kyrie, eleison. Kyrie, eleison.
8. Patrem tuum teque flamen utrorumque, eleison. Kyrie, eleison. Kyrie, eleison.
9. Clemens nobis adsis paraclite ut vivamus in te, eleison. Kyrie, eleison. Kyrie, eleison.

English:

1. Maker of the world, King eternal, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us.
2. O immense source of pity, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us.
3. Drive off all our evils, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us.
4. Christ who art the light of the world and giver of life, have mercy upon us. Christ, have mercy upon us. Christ, have mercy upon us.
5. Consider the wounds produced by the devil’s art, have mercy upon us. Christ, have mercy upon us. Christ, have mercy upon us.
6. Keeping and confirming thy believers, have mercy upon us. Christ, have mercy upon us. Christ, have mercy upon us.
7. We know that God is one and three, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us.
8. Thou and thy Father, an equal light, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us.
9. Thou, merciful unto us, art present with the Holy Spirit that we might live in thee, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us.

5 Myths About Purgatory That Too Many People Still Believe (Maybe Even You!) | ChurchPOP

Today we celebrate All Soul’s Day, we pray for the dead, and we reflect on the reality of Purgatory.

Purgatory. The sourced essay linked here helps us learn the truth about this important doctrine of the Church!

Source: 5 Myths About Purgatory That Too Many People Still Believe (Maybe Even You!) | ChurchPOP

The Triduum of Death: The Forgotten Season of Allhallowtide | ChurchPOP


FTA: “All Hallows Eve, All Hallows, and All Souls.

“These feasts were so important that, in the mid-15th century, Pope Sixtus IV expanded the triduum into a full octave, or 8 day observance. This expanded form of Allhallowtide lasted for centuries until 1955, when it was eliminated by Pope Pius XII as a part of a greater (pre-Vatican II) liturgical reform.This is why Allhallowtide is not normally celebrated today even by traditionalist Catholics, since the Extraordinary Form of the Mass follows the 1962 Roman Missal.”

Source: The Triduum of Death: The Forgotten Season of Allhallowtide | ChurchPOP

Pray for the dead!

The Catholic Origins of Halloween

FTA: “The origins of Halloween are, in fact, very Christian and rather American. Halloween falls on October 31 because of a pope, and its observances are the result of medieval Catholic piety.It’s true that the ancient Celts of Ireland and Britain celebrated a minor festival on October 31–as they did on the last day of most other months of the year. However, Halloween falls on the last day of October because the Solemnity of All Saints, or “All Hallows,” falls on November 1.”

Source: The Catholic Origins of Halloween